Overview


Subject/Sub-Subject: Social Studies/Economics


Title: Industry and Agriculture Economies in the Years Leading Up to the Civil War


Summary:

Students will view images of factory work and plantation work in order to draw conclusions about the differences in the economies of the North and South in the years leading up to the Civil War.


Understanding Goal

Economies are dependent on available resources.

Investigative Question

How was life different in the North and South? How were the economies different?

Grade(s): 4, K
Audience: General
Learners: A class of 17 fourth grade students that includes English Language Learners and students with learning disabilities.
Required Vocabulary: N/A
Prior Content Knowledge: N/A
Standards

Virginia: Social Studies - Grade 4

VA.VS.7.a. Virginia Studies: Civil War and Post-War Eras: The student will demonstrate knowledge of the issues that divided our nation and led to the Civil War by identifying the events and differences between northern and southern states that divided Virginians and led to secession, war, and the creation of West Virginia.

Field Tests

Click on the title to expand the description of each field test

Sources

Industry and Agriculture Economies in the Years Leading Up to the Civil War

Understanding Goal

Economies are dependent on available resources.

Click on an image for more information.

Slideshow Icon View as a slideshow
Reynolds's political map of the United States, designed to exhibit the comparative area of the free and slave states and the territory open to slavery or freedom by the repeal of the Missouri Compromise. Young cotton picker, Pulaski County, Arkansas. Schools for colored children do not open until January 1st so as not to interfere with cotton picking. Cotton field and plantation house. Macon County, Georgia. A cutter at work. The building which houses Garden State Cutting Company. Their space extends north from the corner visible here (north is toward the left of the frame, following the axis of the building toward 20th Avenue, which is not visible here).

Required Materials

Files

Economy.pps
Economy.ppt

Directions

Investigation

Step 1 Display the map that shows the United States in 1860 with a key that differentiates slave states and free states by color. Ask students, "What do you notice? What do you know about the Civil War? How do you think life was different in the North and South?" For each question, have students think of their answers, talk with a partner, and share their ideas with the class. (Think Pair Share)
Step 2 Tell students that the economies in the North and South were different in the years leading up to the Civil War. Start the PowerPoint and show students the slide with key vocabulary. Discuss each word with students.

Files

Step 3 Tell students that today we are going to look at some images and try to figure out how life was different in the North and South. Have students view each picture and respond to the questions (think-pair-share).
Step 4 Show students key vocabulary again. Have students write or illustrate and label what theyve learned using the key vocabulary.
Step 5 Tell students that eventually, the differences between the North and South became so strong that the two sides could not resolve their differences. Ask students: "Why do you think these differences were unable to be resolved?"

Best Instructional Practices


Understanding Goal

Economies are dependent on available resources.

Investigative Question

How was life different in the North and South? How were the economies different?


Analysis of Student Learning


Students were very engaged when viewing the pictures. Some were able to make connections between the pictures and the "big idea" of the differences between the North and South. Many students thought that the factory was a "mint" (a recently learned concept) and they had trouble adjusting their thinking when they got more information.


Analysis of Best Instructional Practices (learn more)

Differentiated Instruction Differentiated Instruction (learn more)

Product

Students interests were addressed by giving a choice between writing and drawing the economic differences between the North and South.

Teaching for Understanding Teaching for Understanding(learn more)

Learners Explain Thinking

Learners label the images to demonstrate their understanding of the vocabulary.

Technology Integration Technology Integration(learn more)

Content Presented

Content for the Learning Experience was presented through a PowerPoint presentation.

Reflections and Recommendations


The students were engaged throughout the lesson. I might have told students ahead of time that the first two pictures are in New Jersey and the last two are in Georgia and Arkansas. This might have scaffolded their understanding a little bit more. I also might have built their background knowledge about slave labor, agriculture, and industry more before they engaged in this learning experience. Students lacked some key vocabulary to discuss these ideas (plantations, factory, industry, labor).

Credits

Authors and Contributors

Kathleen Riley
Glen Forest Elementary School, Fairfax County Public Schools, Virginia

Library of Congress Items

Library of Congress items used in this Lesson Plan.

Thumbnail Library of Congress Item
Reynolds's political map of the United States, designed to exhibit the comparative area of the free and slave states and the territory open to slavery or freedom by the repeal of the Missouri Compromise. Reynolds, W. C. c1856. Reynolds's political map of the United States, designed to exhibit the comparative area of the free and slave states and the territory open to slavery or freedom by the repeal of the Missouri Compromise. Library of Congress: American Memory, Map Collections: 1500-2004.
Young cotton picker, Pulaski County, Arkansas. Schools for colored children do not open until January 1st so as not to interfere with cotton picking. Shahn, B. 1935. Young cotton picker, Pulaski County, Arkansas. Schools for colored children do not open until January 1st so as not to interfere with cotton picking. Library of Congress: American Memory, America from the Great Depression to World War II: Photographs from the FSA and OWI, ca. 1935-1945.
Cotton field and plantation house. Macon County, Georgia. Lange, D. 1937. Cotton field and plantation house. Macon County, Georgia. Library of Congress: American Memory, America from the Great Depression to World War II: Photographs from the FSA and OWI, ca. 1935-1945.
A cutter at work. Carroll, Thomas D. August 31, 1994. A cutter at work. Library of Congress: American Memory, Working in Paterson: Occupational Heritage in an Urban Setting.
The building which houses Garden State Cutting Company. Their space extends north from the corner visible here (north is toward the left of the frame, following the axis of the building toward 20th Avenue, which is not visible here). Carroll, T. D. 1994. The building which houses Garden State Cutting Company. Their space extends north from the corner visible here (north is toward the left of the frame, following the axis of the building toward 20th Avenue, which is not visible here). Library of Congress: American Memory, Working in Paterson: Occupational Heritage in an Urban Setting.