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Overview


Subject/Sub-Subject: Social Studies/Civics


Title: Marbury v. Madison Illustrated


Summary:

Students use primary source images as visuals during a whole class lesson on Marbury vs. Madison.


Understanding Goal

Learning about the past helps human beings to understand the present, and to plan for the future.

Investigative Question

How does Marbury vs. Madison apply to today's society?

Grade(s): 8, 1
Audience: General
Learners: This investigation was implemented with general education eighth grade students with varying skills and abilities.
Required Vocabulary: N/A
Prior Content Knowledge: N/A
Standards

History and Social Studies Standards of Learning for Virginia Public Schools
Civics and Economics

Field Tests

Click on the title to expand the description of each field test

December 31, 1969 - Christopher Malinosky

Sources

Marbury v. Madison Illustrated

Understanding Goal

Learning about the past helps human beings to understand the present, and to plan for the future.

Click on an image for more information.

Slideshow Icon View as a slideshow
Thomas Jefferson, third president of the United States James Madison, fourth President of the United States John Marshall John Adams, second President of the United States

Required Materials

Files

beers.doc

Web Sites

William Marbury, Plaintiff

Directions

Investigation

Step 1 Make placards with these photos of Marbury, Madison, Jefferson & other players.
Step 2 Explain that you will be telling students the story of Marbury v. Madison. (See VA Enhanced Scope and Sequence for the case information and impact.) http://www.pen.k12.va.us/VDOE/EnhancedSandS/histCE.doc
Step 3 Give each student a placard to hold up each time that characters name is mentioned. Imagine a melodrama where the audience hisses each time the villain appears and cheers each time the hero appears.
Step 4 Decide on a phrase for the entire class to say each time a character is mentioned in the story, making sure to use Marbury and Madisons names. (My classes said Hello Mr. Madison for Madison and Here comes the Judge for Justice Marshall etc.)
Step 5 Describe briefly the constitutional issues involved. Then tell the tale of the Marbury case using plenty of names And then President Adams said. . . And then Mr. Jefferson .. Make sure to leave dramatic pauses for students to chime in. Use the representations of the commission and the writ in your description.
Step 6 Wrap up with a more serious conversation on judicial review and its impact over time.
Step 7 This is most suitable for your classes that like to joke and call out. The names of Marbury and Madison stuck with students as do the concepts.

Best Practices


Analysis of Student Learning


Students focused on the activity in order to keep up with their parts. They asked thoughtful questions about Jeffersons motivation and the commission and writ of mandamus. Students remembered the case and the idea of judicial review in subsequent quizzes and other assessments. (By the end they had repeated Marbury and Madisons names many times and figured why the case was so named.) Students asked why we use v. instead of vs, so we talked about conventions for naming cases.


Analysis of Best Instructional Practices (learn more)

Teaching for Understanding Teaching for Understanding(learn more)

Explicit Understanding Goal

Reflections and Recommendations


I would be more confident about insisting that the students pipe in! I was worried whether this would be too corny, but it worked best with my students who really hammed it up.


Credits

Authors and Contributors

Laura Beers
Francis C. Hammond Middle School, Alexandria City Public Schools, Virginia

Library of Congress Items

Library of Congress items used in this Lesson Plan.

Thumbnail Library of Congress Item
Thomas Jefferson, third president of the United States Stuart, G. (1828?). Thomas Jefferson, third president of the United States. Library of Congress: Prints & Photographs, Popular Graphic Arts.
James Madison, fourth President of the United States Pendleton's Lithography. 1828?. James Madison, fourth President of the United States. Library of Congress: Prints & Photographs, Popular Graphic Arts.
John Marshall Whitney, J.H.E. c1889. John Marshall. Library of Congress: Prints & Photographs.
John Adams, second President of the United States Pendleton's Lithography. 1828?. John Adams, second President of the United States. Library of Congress: Prints & Photographs, Popular Graphic Arts.